Visit: London’s Roman Amphitheatre

Part of the course task to find out about the Roman occupation

The remains of Londons Roman Amphitheatre are in the basement of the Guildhall Gallery, down several flights of stairs:

Roman Amphitheatre
Stairs to Roman Amphitheatre

Firstly though you get to a viewing window above and some interesting informational panels:

Roman Amphitheatre
This is from the upstairs viewing window (by the information panels) so the window is causing some weird reflections in the photo but you can see the reflective surface of the metal inlaid drainage indicators on the floor (see later informational panel)

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

 

Once down the stairs and inside the dark room, there are some more signs:

Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

Roman Amphitheatre

 

Here at the entrance I took a panorma photograph. Its pretty big so you can click on it to open it larger:

Panorama - click to see bigger
Panorama – click to see bigger

 

Roman Amphitheatre

 

There are two round plinths in the room with further information on them, (which you can see standing in the middle in the photo above), “Discovery & Remains” and Site history and construction (below):
Roman Amphitheatre

Set into the floor behind glass are the timber remains of drains:
Roman Amphitheatre
Roman Amphitheatre

Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre

 

Roman Amphitheatre

Roman Amphitheatre

Roman Amphitheatre

Reflection:
There’s a lot of information that they provide, but a lot of it is conjecture. They have done the best they can to make it an attraction for the tourists (with the funcky lights and wireframe gladiators). They have a sound track with cheering too, to simulate really being in the arena (I suspect it would have been much loader and more smelly though)! There’s only so much you can do to jazz up a series of small walls. If you only spend a few minutes down there this isnt very affective but after a while it gets to you and you can actually ‘see’ what they were trying to achieve with their lights extending out the structure. The little rooms to the side seem a bit small, if it was a modern building I’d have assumed some sort of ticket booth but that’s not what the experts thought. I was suprise the timber drainage system survival all these years. The collisseum it isnt, but it’s certainly very interesting.

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